University of Arkansas Office for Education Policy

Just the Facts: Integration in the Little Rock Area Part 4 Current Integration in LR

In The View from the OEP on November 16, 2016 at 3:56 pm

As part of our ongoing examination of integration in the Little Rock Area public school system, we are pleased to announce the fourth brief in our series which examines the current state of integration. In this brief, we again explore questions of race and poverty and compare across traditional public school (TPS) and public charter school sectors.

We wondered:

  • What percentage of students go to racially hyper-segregated schools where 90% or more of the students are the same race?
  • What percentage of students go to socioeconomically hyper-segregated schools where 90% or more of the students are eligible for Free/Reduced Lunch?
  • What percentage of students attend racially integrated schools?
  • What percentage of students attend socioeconomically integrated schools?

To answer these questions, we used school demographic data from 2008-09 to 2014-15.

As shown in the table below, in 2014-15, only 4 TPSs and 1 charter school in the Little Rock Metro Area (LRMA) were identified as racially hyper-segregated. Little Rock Metro Area includes traditional public schools in LRSD, NLRSD and PCSSD as well as all public charter schools in the area.

 Number of Schools in the Little Rock Metro Area by Percent Black Enrollment, 2014-15 by Sector.pb_1415

What percentage of students go to racially hyper-segregated schools where 90% or more of the students are the same race? Less than 7%, but varies slightly by sector.

Over the seven years examined,  6% of charter students, 5% of LRMA TPS students, and 7% of LRSD students attended schools where 90% or more of students are of the same race.

 

 

What percentage of students go to socioeconomically hyper-segregated schools where 90% or more of the students are the eligible for Free/Reduced Price Lunch? About 20% overall, but varies significantly by sector.

Over the seven years examined, 3% of charter students, 18% of LRMA TPS students, and 22% of LRSD students attended schools where 90% or more of students are eligible for Free/Reduced Lunch.

 

 

What percentage of students go to racially integrated schools where the student racial demographics are similar to the Little Rock Metro Area public school population as a whole?  About 40% overall, and varies slightly by sector and black or white enrollment.

Over the seven years examined, 50% of charter students, 47% of LRMA TPS students, and 42% of LRSD students attended schools where the percentage of black students enrolled was similar to the LRMA average overall (+/- 15 percentage points).  When white integration is examined, however, there are differences by sector:  60% of charter students, 37% of LRMA TPS students, and 27% of LRSD students attended schools where the percentage of white students enrolled was similar to the LRMA average overall (+/- 15 percentage points).

 

 

What percentage of students go to socioeconomically integrated schools where the student FRL percentage is similar to the Little Rock Metro Area public school population as a whole?  Fewer than 37% overall, and varies significantly by sector.

Over the seven years examined, 14% of charter students, 37% of LRMA TPS students, and 25% of LRSD students attended schools where the percentage of FRL students enrolled was similar to the LRMA average overall (+/- 15 percentage points).

Perhaps in part due to the smaller number of schools in the charter group, charters evidenced greater differences from the area average in the percent black students. Charters also evidenced greater differences from the area average in the percent FRL students. The area average is largely driven by the traditional public schools and we have seen in previous briefs how charters enroll a more economically advantaged population.  It is important to remember that like traditional public schools, charter schools cannot select students based on demographic characteristices.  Unlike traditional schools, charter students do not have to live within certain geographic boundaries.

 

Now that we have an understanding of the current state of racial and socioeconomic integration in Little Rock Area Public Schools, we can answer the question of whether student moves are helping to integrate or segregate the Little Rock Metro Area school system. Stay tuned to find out the results of  whether the student moves between traditional and charter schools helped the public schools look more or less like the overall demographics of the Little Rock Metro Area.

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  1. This is in direct contradiction to what Was published in the Democratic Gazette on November 13, 2016.

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

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