University of Arkansas Office for Education Policy

OEP Awards: High Achieving High Schools

In The View from the OEP on November 7, 2012 at 11:59 am

Since late summer, we have been recognizing high-achieving schools across the state in our annual Office for Education Policy Awards. To date, we have released four installments of OEP Awards recognizing the following:

Today we release our fifth installment: High Achieving High Schools. This section of the OEP awards differs slightly from earlier sections linked above in that achievement is being measured by performance on four End-of-Course (EOC) exams in Algebra, Geometry, Biology and (Grade 11) Literacy. This section of the report is divided into subsections based on scores from each of the four tests. Because the tests are not  “grade-specific” – that is, not all students in grade 9 take algebra – some take it in 10th grade – some in 7th grade, etc. –  there are subsections to account for school performance based on grades served. For example, the sections reporting Algebra and Geometry EOC performance  includes the top high schools serving grades 9-12, a separate list of the top “junior high schools” serving grades 7&8 (with students who took an EOC exam), and a separate list of “middle schools” serving students through grade 7. In addition, each section includes awards for the top “high poverty” schools, and the top five schools by region. You can access this section of the report by clicking here – or – click this link to access the full report with all five sections listed above.

Huntsville High School

As such, there were several high schools recognized in multiple categories. For example, Huntsville High School is recognized for high school (grades 9-12) Algebra and Geometry EOC performance. In algebra, 96% of the 127 students who took the Algebra EOC in grades 9-12 scored at the proficient or advanced level. The school earned an Algebra EOC GPA of 3.55 which was good enough to earn the top spot in this OEP Award category. In geometry, 97% of the 63 students who took the Geometry EOC in grades 9-12 scored at the proficient or advanced level. The school earned an Algebra EOC GPA of 3.75 which was good enough to earn the top spot on this OEP Award category. This 3.75 GPA is remarkable because it suggests a higher number of students scoring in the highest (advanced) range of this EOC exam. You can read more about our GPA measure – and our justification for using it in the introduction to the OEP Awards. Congratulations to principal Lewis Villines and the algebra and geometry teachers at Huntsville High!!

The Marked Tree mascot.

Among the high performing high schools with high FRL percentages, Marked Tree High School topped the list in on Algebra EOC performance. Marked Tree High School, with 79% of their students receiving a free or reduced priced lunch (FRL) had 93% of the 40 students in grades 9-12 who took the Algebra EOC scoring at the proficient or advanced level. Further, the school earned an Algebra EOC GPA of 3.35. Congratulations to principal Matt Wright and the Algebra teachers at Marked Tree High!

Caddo Hills High School topped the list among high poverty high school performance on the Geometry EOC. With 81% FRL, Caddo Hills High had 100% of the 30 students in grades 9-12 who took the Geometry EOC scoring at the proficient or advanced level. Further, the school earned a Geometry EOC GPA of 3.60 indicating that slightly more students were performing at the advanced level on this exam. Congratulations to principal Stacy Vines and the Geometry teachers at Caddo Hills High!!

On the Biology EOC, Omaha High School in the Omaha School District was featured on both the overall top performing high school lists, as well as the high performing high poverty high school list. Likewise, Hector High School topped the same lists for Grade 11 Literacy EOC performance. But if you want to see their specific performance numbers…and all the other schools that earned OEP Awards for EOC test performance…you’ll have to click here to read the report!

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